The Center for Hunger-Free Communities

Solutions Based on Science and the Human Experience

Housing

Active 2008-Present
 

"I want them to be smart. I want them to finish school. I want them to get good jobs. I want them to know that just because you live in the neighborhood doesn’t mean you have to be in the neighborhood.  It’s just I don’t know where to get help from; I don’t know who to ask for help."

Active 2008-2012
 

"How safe are you in this city? The police officer that just got killed the other day . . . if you could do that to a cop, what could you do to me? These kids, they need an outlet. And this community is not it. North Philly is not it... These kids have nowhere to go for safety or fun."

Active 2008-Present

 

With Welfare now, what we get nowadays, it’s enough to live off of but it’s not enough to do anything to make our environment safer for our children... So the jobs that I need or that I want that I’m qualified for I can’t get because I need an education. And I tell [Welfare] that and it’s like, well, that’s just too bad, basically, you have to get a job. I need an education… But I’m held back, I’m at a standstill."

Active 2008-Present

 

Why me? Why do my bills have to get cut off for $84? I don’t have a hundred and something dollars a month to pay the gas, electricity, phone company, and buy Pampers and buy food, pay my rent. I don’t have money like that. I know God makes a way for everybody, but right now I’m struggling.

See Myra featured in The Philadelphia Inquirer.

Active 2008-Present
 

"His cousin was trying to get some other boy and shot Troy (my baby’s father) thinking it was someone else.  The gunshots just kept on going.  He got shot nine times.  All he was saying was, 'I’m gonna be alright.  I’m gonna be alright.'  And his eyes just closed.   I wanted to get an abortion after that because I was just thinking, 'How am I going to do this?'” 

I’ve been trying my best to pay my rent.  It’s been a struggle; it’s been hard.  I can’t let myself go down. I can’t be in a shelter with five kids. My kids are going to get depressed. Who knows what can happen? I always say I would never give up on my kids.

Active 2008-Present
 

"I always say I would never give up on my kids. I always would try to do the best for them to at least graduate from high school because I’m not going to be able to afford for them to go to college or anything like that...I will never give up on them. I will always push them and try my best."

Active 2008-Present
 

"I went through a lot of stuff, but it’s all done with. I’m all right now, so I've got to move forward, can’t go back and change everything. The thing I tell my kids is don’t make the same mistakes."

Active 2008-Present
 

"I don’t think a human on this earth can love until they have a baby."

See Tamika featured in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Tamika is 29 and has two children, aged 3 and 4. 

Active 2008-Present
 

"I wish people would just look at you for who you are, and not treat you like they are superior; like you’re on a different level just because you need Welfare.  I’m so used to being let down. I’m so used to being disappointed.  I’m so used to everything just crumbling down on me that I don’t ask for any help anymore."

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